Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Meet Sandra Dailey

My guest in My Writing Corner today is author Sandra Dailey. Tell me a little of your writing journey.  On your website you say you started telling stories at a very young age. How did you get started on the road to publication?

My mother believed in a quiet house, even though she had seven children. Story telling was a way to keep the little ones entertained. We older kids would also play ‘I had a dream last night’ and try to come up with a more outrageous story than the last one. Later, my husband and I had four children, close in age. It was natural to pick up the story telling again. It wasn’t until the house was empty of children that I started writing my stories. My family encouraged me to seek publication. I still think of myself more as a story teller than a writer.
Did you know you were meant to be a writer when you were making up those stories?

I never considered being a writer until my mother talked me into taking a writing course with Long Ridge Writers Group. It was mostly about writing articles and short magazine stories, but I learned a lot about characterization, disruption, plotting, submission, etc… I was the ripe old age of 55 when my first real book was published.

Who are some of your favorite authors in the romance genre?
There are so many! I guess my short list would be:
 Nora Roberts, Linda Lael Miller, Lori Foster, Brenda Novak, and Laura Kaye. I’m very diverse in my reading though. It’s not all romance. My favorite authors of all time are Heather Graham, Iris Johansen and James Patterson.
Tell us a little about your newest work, Common Enemy. What gave you the idea for this story?

Driving through a rain storm one day made me think about the years I’d lived in the Everglades. That led me to remember some of the unusual crimes that happened in the area that no one talks about. I decided to combine a few in a story.

What do you like best about your hero?

Love turns Connors despair into determination and his hopelessness into hope. He’s willing to strip away his insecurities to protect the people close to him.

What about your heroine?

Jordan may seem weak and dependant in some ways, but she’s been through hell and she’s determined not to go back. She’s a lamb that turns into a lioness when her loved ones are in danger.

What are you working on now?
My priority is Close Enemy. The sequel to Common Enemy is about Connor’s brother, Caleb McCrae. It’s a much different story, in a much different setting, but equally exciting.
I’m also working on two mysteries, Deep Blue and Independence Day, (tentative titles).
Where do you come up with your ideas?

Everywhere! I’m like a sponge. A subplot in a book or movie, song lyrics, overheard conversations, or the back of a soup can. They come from everywhere and all the time. I keep an index card box full. There’s no way for me to write them all.
Do you have any words of advice to beginning writers?

You should network with other writers in your genre. Seek them out. Ask questions. Share favors, (promoting and reviewing each other’s books). It’s the greatest support system you’ll find.
How about a blurb?

Jordan Holbrook is the single mother of a five-year-old daughter. She’s just inherited her Grandmother’s house in South Florida where she’s hiding from an abusive ex-husband who’s been released from prison early. A new man in her life isn't part of her plans.

Connor McCrae is a handyman who lives out of his van. He walked away from a privileged life and loving family after being badly scarred in a vicious attack. He doesn't believe a woman’s love is in the cards for him.

What brings them together is a rundown house, a mutual attraction, and a Common Enemy.

Bobby Ray Butler is cutting a path of murder and mayhem through south Florida in his quest for vengeance. His sights are set on his ex-wife and anyone who gets in his way.

How can readers reach you or find you online?
http://www.sandradailey.blogspot.com


Thank you, Sandra and good luck with Common Enemy.  Any questions or comments for Sandra?

10 comments:

  1. You have a beautiful blog, Rebecca. Thank you for inviting me. I look forward to meeting some of your friends today. All questions or comments are welcome.

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  2. Hi, ladies. Great interview. Story tellers make the best writers, don't they? I love that your mother liked a quiet house with seven children. My mom managed it with five, too, whereas I never attained quiet with only three. (I didn't want it, so that was okay, but couldn't have done it regardless. )

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    1. I know what you mean Liz. Our house was quiet with four children, but that's because we were always outside. ;)

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  3. Great interview ladies. I don't have the time to visit as many blogs as I once did, but since my mind is still pulling together the elements for the next scene before I crawl into my writing cave for the day, I had the time to stop by and visit my old friend, Sandra, and check out Rebecca Grace's lovely blog. Good luck to you both!

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    1. My writing cave is calling as well, Vonnie. Rebecca was worth the interruption though. Glad you could come by.

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  4. Interesting how you came to writing via storytelling, and especially, the part about relating dreams.

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  5. The only children's books in the house belonged to my older sister and she didn't share. However, you can't hoard someone else's imagination. Thanks for dropping by Hebby. I believe this is the first time we've met, (so to speak).

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  6. I had a dream... that my sister wrote stories that were fun, romantic and exciting and her family was very proud of her.

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    1. Anonymous, my behind. I'd know my twin sister, Gail, anywhere. You may be interested to know that she writes amazing stories. However, she isn't ready to tackle the publishing monster yet. Hey, girl! Good to have you here.

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  7. Enjoyed Common Enemy, Sandra. My type of book. You have some great characters in there and the setting is intriguing. For a dim-witted guy, Bobby Ray sure had a big effect on people's livies.

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